OC Participate Delivers Better ePRO Data, Faster

With patient-centricity claiming more and more of the spotlight in both research and care (rightfully so), patient-reported outcomes will only play a large roles in clinical trials. But there are significant obstacles to getting quality data from PRO measures. Patients, especially those who are very sick, don’t want to hand-write dry medical diary entries. They don’t want to learn yet another electronic device, download and manage an app, or have to recall yet one more password. And who can blame them? Trial participants are the heroes of the research story, and when it comes to the collaborative process of data gathering, they deserve a hero’s welcome.

That’s why we developed OpenClinica Participate. We’re gratified by the success our clients have found leveraging this innovative ePRO solution, but we’re not surprised. When you prioritize a trial subject’s convenience and obsess over making things simple, you simply get better results. Here’s an example. Let’s call it:

Out with the old, in with the new

OpenClinica teamed with Danish CRO, Signifikans, to implement OpenClinica Participate for a leading Denmark-based bioscience technology company developing an innovative treatment to alleviate colorectal disorders, a common side effect of numerous medicines affecting millions of people at any time. The study’s objective was to investigate exercise induced intestinal permeability, immune markers, and bowel habits in 18-40 year old healthy volunteers. Participants were given two strains of bifidobacterium, an anaerobic bacteria that resides in the intestinal tract. The study involved 48 participants throughout Sweden, and each patient was required to provide 65 daily diaries in addition to 5 in-person visits over the course of the study.

The Old Way

In a similar prior study, the sponsor collected paper diaries from 700 participants. Each participant provided their (hopefully) completed and accurate paper diary to their site coordinator during the in-person study visits. The site coordinators then delivered the completed paper diaries to a data coordinating center. Coordinating center staff then scanned the diaries into a document management system and an overseas data entry vendor used a double data entry workflow to populate a database. Completed diaries were scanned and uploaded in batches for data entry. Phew!

On average, four months elapsed between the point of data capture and the first day of availability of that data to the sponsor. Monitoring participant compliance was also a challenge in this study, as it was
impossible to discern when each patient actually completed their daily diary. The expenditures associated with this process for data entry tallied over $213 per patient diary, or $4.97 per diary page.

Overall, this process was cumbersome, expensive, and logistically complex. The sponsor was planning a similar new study, and this time around was determined to find a way to

  • get faster access to the study data,
  • improve data reliability, and
  • reduce costs

The New Way

The sponsor enlisted local specialty CRO, Signifikans, to help it identify and implement a better approach. Signifikans recognized that with OpenClinica Participate, the sponsor could have immediate access to patient data, and that this data would automatically sit right alongside data captured from other sources during the study. No EDC integration was necessary.

Signifikans also took the lead on configuring the study in OpenClinica. (Our “make it simple” credo guides how we design tools for data managers, as well. That’s why we have invested so much in our forms engine, a topic for another post.) While building the study, Signifikans was able to easily demo prototypes to the sponsor along the way, iterating rapidly through edits and changes. Data capture forms were developed in the Swedish language, and the study was configured to send email reminders to patients to help ensure diaries were completed on time. The reminders contained a secure, uniquely-identified link the participant could click to go right to their diary, eliminating the need for participants to remember usernames and passwords.

Results

As soon as the study went live, the sponsor was able to monitor precisely when data were captured; something that was not possible with the old paper-based method. They observed, for example, that all five participants enrolled in the study’s first week each completed their diary card daily, per the protocol. The sponsor’s confidence in patient compliance and data quality surged; so much so, that they implemented an increase in the amount of data being collected this way. Scaling that quickly would have been impossible with paper diaries and slow transcription processes.

“Participate was very low friction: set-up was quick and efficient, and patients really seemed to embrace the technology.”

– Andreas Habicht, CEO, Signifikans Aps

The OpenClinica solution delivered a unified study database out-of-the-box, with patient-reported data sitting alongside clinician-reported data and accessible via the same interface. Having everything in one audit log made it easy to follow the patient’s trajectory through the study. Signifikans was able to use the same tools to configure and manage both ePRO and non-ePRO aspects of the study, resulting in a faster time-to-launch, and facilitating mid-study changes.

In addition to enhanced data quality and faster access to data, the cost of data capture per diary with OpenClinica Participate resulted in cost savings of over 80%.


Comparison: Paper vs. Participate
(click to enlarge)

Keep an eye out for more ePRO success stories on this blog. Our next post will delve into a different topic, but, as with this one, you can be sure it will feature better results through a better eClinical experience.

My Resolution for 2017

The traditional month for making resolutions is over, but since the first day of the year, I’ve been hard at work on mine. I shared it with my team members early in January, and now I want to make it public.

My resolution for 2017 is to make life easier.

Not necessarily for me–though I’d take it–but for clients and collaborators of OpenClinica. The pace of clinical research will only accelerate, so eclinical software (and its users) will need to keep up or get left behind. While we can always make improvements in processing power and data storage, the big gains will come from empowering our users to do more in less time and to rapidly make smart decisions. In the world of electronic data capture, that means giving data managers powerful tools to get studies started, to seamlessly integrate randomization, EDC, and ePRO, and to gain insight into their queried and missing forms.

As a team, we’ve adopted “making the complex easy” as our theme for 2017. As you’ll see in the posts below, we’re poised to do just that. We have new clients that will challenge us to break new ground. We have new team members bringing that rare combination of domain expertise and raw passion. And we have a growing appreciation of the role ePRO will play in identifying therapies that aren’t only efficacious, but effective. So if my life doesn’t get any easier this year, it’s still bound to be exciting.

Our newest clients represent the future of research and care

New client relationships are exciting in any business. But they don’t get much more gratifying than the ones we’ve been fortunate to make. Looking back over the last six months of new client relationships, I’ve been struck with the emergence of some inspiring trends. A focus on personalized medicine. The willingness to take on looming problems in population health. The application of advanced computing and “big data” to challenges old and new. It’s been a potent reminder of the impact that our work here at OpenClinica makes possible.

Here is just a sample of the new partners that are energizing us:

The biotechnologists at miR Diagnostics specialize in the development of prognostic testing in cancer treatment. Their mission is to provide people diagnosed with cancer a deeper understanding their disease, and to help them make the safest, most informed treatment decisions possible. Using state of the art research, miR Diagnostics has developed cutting-edge, prognostic cancer testing systems that provide insight into tumor progression previously impossible to ascertain.

With Tools4Patient, too, medicine is personal. Tools4Patient develops companion diagnostics which contribute to the design of new treatment paradigms to improve outcomes and enhance quality of life for patients. Their first commercialized tool, Placebell, increases the sensitivity and power of clinical research results through improved Individual Placebo Response characterization.

From microbial pathogenesis to gene therapy, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children’s is claiming new frontiers on behalf of children from around the world. Add to that incredible mission a suite of stunning computational resources, and we knew we needed to work together.

Mercy Research, a centralized, multi-faceted research group within the Mercy health system, conducts more than 700 clinical studies at any given time. They’ve developed more than 40 innovating products and are now building one of the foremost teams for healthcare analytics. Suffice it to say, we’re proud to play our role in this enormous enterprise.

Malaria is responsible for more childhood mortality than any other single infectious agent. At Sanaria, through collaborations with renowned institutions like University of Tübingen, Germany, research is taking on a big aim: eradication through vaccination.  

Biolux Research develops technologies that enhance clinical outcomes and dramatically reduce treatment timelines in dentistry, implantology and orthodontics in a safe, effective and non-invasive approach. Learn how they’ve already succeeded with OrthoPulse®.

Again, these are only examples. In the space of a blog post, I can’t do justice to these missions, those of the new clients I didn’t mention, and the many we’ve been helping to advance for years. But I will be reporting our progress in making all these ventures like these as successful as they can be.

 

New eCRFs (Colleague Revelation Forms)

OpenClinica has welcomed several new team members over the last few months. We’ve collected some eCRFs (Collegue Revelation Forms) to introduce them!

Name: Paul Bowen
Title: Product Owner
Responsibility: I bridge the gap between our stakeholders and our engineering team to ensure that we build the features into OpenClinica that are needed most.
Background: Prior to joining OpenClinica, I spent ten years at Quintiles/Outcome Sciences developing an EDC platform for late phase studies. I also spent one year at Clinical Ink working on a patient engagement app.
What I love about research: I like being a part of something that is making people’s lives better in a significant way.
What I love about technology: Technology provides us with many new options to improve the way we do research. Working to figure out the best solutions is a fun part of this job.
What I love outside of work: When the weather is nice, my girlfriend and I like taking long walks with our dog. When it’s not as nice, we like watching sci-fi TV and movies.


Name:
 Bryan Farrow
Title: eClinical Catalyst
Responsibility: I’m the link between the data management community and OpenClinica. It’s my job to distribute news about our products and services to data managers who’ve been looking for solutions to industry-wide problems like integration and ease of use. Just as importantly, I bring unmet challenges back to our incredible team of developers and customer success professionals so that we can find a solution.
Background: Prior to joining OpenClinica, I spent five years at DrugDev, learning how just how much technology can affect the duration, cost and experience of running a trial. Prior to that, I was responsible for physician and patient communications at Boston Children’s Hospital.
What I love about research: The journey and the destination. Asking questions, devising ways to get an answer, and analyzing evidence are thrilling. With clinical research, we get to do all that with the aim of improving lives.
What I love about technology: For me, technology comes down to problem-solving. If you’re curious and persistent, you can always find a better way. And it’s so gratifying when you do.
What I love outside of work: My family above all. I love being a father to my two kids and a partner to my incredible wife. But when I need some “me time”, I usually reach for a book or journal dealing with philosophy. That was my major in college, and I’m still enamored with the power of logic and the gravity of big ethical and political questions.

Name: Brittany Stark
Title: Project Manager
Responsibility: I direct client projects involving the implementation of clinical trials using OpenClinica software. I oversee the planning, build, testing, and delivery of client projects on time, within scope and budget.
Background: Prior to joining OpenClinica, I spent 4 years in the Cancer Clinical Trials Office at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, working with phase 0-IV clinical trials in oncology. During this time, I gained experience as a Clinical Research Coordinator, Regulatory Affairs Specialist and later Clinical Trials Staff Educator. Prior to this, I spent over 4 years working in academia at the University of Kentucky (in a Human Behavioral Pharmacology and Clinical Psychology Lab) and later at the University of Maine (teaching SPSS as part of a Research Methods and Designs Course Lab).
What I love about research: The potential to advance our understanding of the world we live in and change lives for the better.

Name: Chris White
Title: Customer Success Team Lead
Responsibility: I direct client projects involving the implementation of clinical trials using OpenClinica software. I oversee the planning, build, testing, and delivery of client projects on time, within scope and budget.
Background: Prior to joining OpenClinica, I spent two years in the consulting industry working with many different types of software. Prior to that, I spent 14 years creating positive customer experiences with two successful start-ups, helping to build their client focused operations.
What I love about research: There is still part of me that is the seven-year-old Calvin (from Calvin and Hobbes), always asking questions, wanting to know and understand the wide world around me.

 

 

What prevents you from doing (more) ePRO?

Patient-reported outcomes give us insights that no clinical assessment, imaging study and lab report can. For subjective measures, such as mood or energy level, there’s often no other source. But common methods of collecting PRO, from paper diaries to provisioned devices, pose real barriers. We want to know which ones you’ve faced. Tell us by completing the form below. We have more to say on the topic, but we want to start with your experiences!

Is Your Clinical Trial Software Effective, or Just Efficacious? (Part 2 of 2)

When it comes to your assessing your trial technology, your data managers, study coordinators, Investigators and senior leaders are all study subjects.

In the previous post, I described the difference between efficacy and effectiveness, an increasingly important concept in clinical research and healthcare. After stressing the importance of effectiveness research to health policy planning and patient decision-making, I summarized seven criteria for identifying effectiveness studies. Finally, I asked whether these criteria could be re-purposed beyond a medical intervention to inform how we measure the effectiveness of software systems used to conduct clinical trials.

Is it possible to assess clinical trial software through the lens of effectiveness, as opposed to just efficacy?

I believe that it’s not only possible, but crucial. Why? We all want to reduce the time and cost it takes to deliver safe, effective drugs to those that need them. But if we don’t scrutinize our tools for doing so, we risk letting the status quo impede our progress. When lives are on the line, we can’t afford to let any inefficiency stand.

In this post, I adapt the criteria for effectiveness studies in clinical research into a methodology for evaluating the effectiveness of clinical research software. I limit the scope of adaptation to electronic data capture (EDC) systems, but I suspect that a similar methodology could be developed for CTMS, IVR, eTMF and other complementary technologies. If I open a field of inquiry, or even just broaden one that exists, I’ll consider it time well spent.

Continue reading Is Your Clinical Trial Software Effective, or Just Efficacious? (Part 2 of 2)

Is Your Clinical Trial Software Effective, or Just Efficacious? (Part 1 of 2)

Are you measuring all the relevant outcomes of your clinical trial technology?

For pure pathogen-killing power, it’s hard to beat a surgeon’s hand scrub. Ask any clinician, and she’ll tell you how thoroughly chlorhexidine disinfects skin. If she’s a microbiologist, she’ll even explain to you the biocide’s mechanism of action–provided you’re still listening. But how would the practice fare, say, as a method of cold and flu prevention on a college campus? Your skepticism here would seem justified. After all, it’s hard to sterilize a cough in the dining hall.

Efficacy and effectiveness. It’s unfortunate their phonetics are so close, because while the terms do refer to relative locations along a continuum, they’re the furthest thing from synonyms, as the ever accumulating literature on the topic will attest.

In this post and the one that follows, I’d like to offer some clarity on efficacy vs. effectiveness and illustrate the value that each type of analysis offers. If nothing else, what emerges should provide an introduction to the concepts for those new to clinical research. But I have a more speculative aim, too. I’d like propose standards for assessing trial technology through each of these lenses. Why? Because while we’ve been asking whether a particular technology does what it’s explicitly designed to do, as we should and must, we may have forgotten to ask a critical follow-up question: Does it improve the pace and reliability of our research?

Continue reading Is Your Clinical Trial Software Effective, or Just Efficacious? (Part 1 of 2)

Introducing OpenClinica v4

The OC16 Conference (Oct 3-4 in Boston) is two weeks away and I’m thrilled to be there to introduce the all-new OpenClinica.

The OpenClinica project started 11 years ago with two goals in mind: use the web to help clinical researchers get better, faster data, and champion an open technology model that gives users the power to extend and customize it to their needs.

These goals remain our main focus and are as important as ever. Achieving them improves quality, gets new discoveries to patients faster, improves patient satisfaction, and reduces costs. But clinical trials keep getting more complex, expensive, and harder. Better technology is a must, and it’s time for OpenClinica to evolve.

Here’s a quick preview of what we’ll be showing at OC16. It has two main components:

1. OpenClinica 4 is a self-service e-source, patient engagement, and EDC platform with low cost of entry, rapid startup, optimized workflows, and massive scalability. It is designed to save time, work great in mobile environments, and encourage better collaboration. Picture:

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  • Working with your colleagues in real time on protocol design, in a visual, drag-and-drop way. When ready, its one-click to deploy to test, training, and production environments,
  • A fast, mobile-friendly, flexible forms engine with real-time edit checks, powerful expression logic, and advanced multimedia capabilities
  • Quickly, seamlessly, and securely inviting other users. Have them trained and working productively with the system in a self-service, fully automated way, and
  • Smart & customizable reports, dashboards, and queues that help you work better.

2. The OpenClinica 4 Toolkit is an open, modular environment for building health and research apps that guarantees high-integrity, trustworthy data and adherence to rigorous standards of quality. Developers in healthcare need to be able to easily build mobile & web-based health apps with powerful data collection, workflow, messaging, and visualization capabilities. A junior developer or a healthcare professional with some web programming background will be able to set up a development environment in 5-10 minutes, get a free developer key, and build a ‘hello world’ module in under 30. The toolkit, with a smart mix of modern web & mobile tools, the right amount of domain-specific intelligence, and guaranteed data integrity & security, can unlock immense productivity and innovation. The fundamental features OpenClinica is already built around– trustworthy data provenance, flexible data models, secure REST APIs, and high quality–are a great basis for such a toolkit.

Some key parts of the OpenClinica 4 technology have already been in use for over a year now in OpenClinica Participate. OpenClinica LLC’s engineers have been hard at work on the first four components of OC v4:  the protocol designer, the new form engine, a multi-tenant cloud architecture with single sign on, and self-service training. We will be putting these into use in trials early next year. Other components, like customizable dashboards, workflows, and improved reporting, and the toolkit will soon follow.

Over the past several months, 25 dedicated members of the OpenClinica community, with expertise in clinical trials, EDC, ePRO, data management, and community-based development, have worked in five advisory groups – EDC, Study Startup, eSource, API, and Community – providing strategic direction and ideas to shape the new OpenClinica.

Want to find out more? OC16’s opening panel will have a member of each advisory group sharing their view on where OpenClinica is going, and throughout the day we’ll have live demos, discussion, and training on OpenClinica 4. Come join us at OC16!