Selling open source without mentioning open source

I am a regular reader of  “The Open Road” blog by Matt Assay on news.com. In one of his latest posts, “Getting open-source criticism wrong”, he does a great job of making the case that commercial open source software is about ease of adoption, flexibility, and choice.

It struck a chord because my sales team and I spend a great amount of time and effort explaining to prospective customers that we offer the same level of quality, stability, performance, service, and support as a proprietary vendor. In many cases we must meet a higher threshold than those vendors, because we do not have the lock-in of a commercial software license to compel customers to come back to us for repeat business. Our track record of successful long-term customer relationship is evidence we meet this threshold.

In certain sales situations, for the sake of simplicity and clarity, we have to focus only on these apples-to-apples characteristics, and do not have the opportunity to educate on the economic and technical advantages of OSS as much as we would like. It’s great to know that our open source clinical data management software technology and service offerings can stand successfully on these merits. However, as many readers of this blog already know, open source offers an additional set of critical benefits: “the ability to adopt software rapidly and at low cost, the flexibility to develop and extend their systems as they choose, and the ability to reduce risk by obtaining paid commercial-grade [or better] support”. As more decision makers are coming to understand, it is following this path, rather than the adoption of pricey, monolithic proprietary software, that leads to better outcomes and greater ROI.

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