Engineering OpenClinica’s Future

We recently introduced OpenClinica Participate™.

We believe all research participants—patients, clinicians, researchers, should have technology that meets the ‘anytime, anywhere’ expectations of a mobile, smartphone enabled world. Based on conversations with the OpenClinica community, many of you share this view as well. We are committed to making sure, at minimum, that OpenClinica’s patient engagement technology ‘just works’ in mobile, real world environments. Wherever possible, we will go beyond that and work to make the participant experience engaging, fun, and inspiring.

As transformational as these patient engagement capabilities can be, what we’ve been working on is about more than that. This is about a foundation for the future of the OpenClinica project.

EnketoAs I briefly pointed out in an earlier post, OpenClinica Participate forms are powered by the new enketo-express app that was built around the widely used enketo-core form engine (both available on GitHub).

OpenROSA_LogoOpenClinica will soon natively support the OpenRosa API, which will let you run Enketo, ODK Collect, or any of a number of OpenRosa-compliant data capture clients. Eventually, we envision the Enketo forms engine will replace the current CRF engine in the OpenClinica code base.

odk_medium_squareIf you’re not familiar with Enketo, ODK, or OpenRosa, here’s a primer. Most important is understanding there is a rich global ecosystem of technology, developers and users around the OpenRosa Xform standard. The resultant solutions have been battle tested in diverse health care and field-based data collection settings over many years. In keeping with the open source principles of flexibility and choice, aligning the OpenClinica ecosystem with this community will provide new features and options that you can use.

As my 5 year-old son has taught me when we watch Spider-Man cartoons, with great power comes great responsibility. So it is with open source software. Tapping in to the richness and variety of the OpenRosa community creates new possibilities, but it can add complexity too by expanding the options you have to choose from. OpenClinica is released under an open source license so that many developers can improve, combine, and share their code in a way that enhances quality, usability, and features, and we believe that this richness will drive the next cycle of innovation.

With this goal of better encouraging code contributions, the focus of the repositories and downloads will be easy-to-use open-source libraries: building blocks for developers to create their own OpenClinica-powered apps and modules.

If you are developing on the OpenClinica code base to add features or build custom solutions, you’ll have a greater ability to mix and match just the pieces you need, and to share back your improvements in a modular fashion. It will be much easier for developers to use the libraries and share their experience and contributions back with the community. We will gladly help out if you experience issues. Our own engineers will be able to focus more of their time on improving quality, usability, and functionality, rather than on packaging, testing, and supporting so many different environments. We hope to build a strong collaboration with the Enketo and OpenRosa communities that spawns new ideas and developments.

So try it out! Check out OpenClinica Participate or get started by hooking up OpenClinica with Enketo.

And need I say, you’ll certainly be able to learn more about these OpenClinica innovations at the upcoming OC15 conference in Amsterdam, May 31-June 1.

OpenClinica on Twitter!

Chances are, you have heard of Twitter, the micro-blogging service that has become wildly popular. In every sphere, including the life sciences, Twitter has attracted a large and diverse audience. OpenClinica now operates its own Twitter account (@OpenClinica) since late spring, and in that time we’ve used it to connect with users, reach out to new people, and circulate relevant content from around the Web.

twitter on flickr

Among the people we now follow on Twitter, we have:

We invite you to follow us there and also follow us on our LinkedIn group, where we can start new conversations and continue old ones.

How Open Source EDC Can Make Clinical Trials More Productive

Barbara Zwick, from the European clinical trial Evidence and Performance Blog recently published an interview with Ben Baumann, Director of Business Development at Akaza Research. The interview discusses how open source EDC (Electronic Data Capture) clinical trials software can help enhance product time to market and overall productivity of clinical trials. Here are some excerpts from the interview:

[BZ] Today’s big Pharma R&Ds are increasing their demand for efficiency and effectiveness. How are you facing this accelerating demand for speed to market?

[BB] There are a number of ways that OpenClinica can accelerate time-to-market. First, open source software can be much easier and quicker to evaluate and get up and running than proprietary software. People can readily install it and experiment with it. Potential adopters can readily inspect everything down to the source code and directly interact with other members of the OpenClinica community to get rapid, unbiased, real-world feedback.

In addition to a full set of EDC and CDM features one might expect in such a system, OpenClinica has  built-in features that give users the ability to set-up their own studies. Therefore, an organization can get a complete picture of how well the system will work for them before committing to use it.

In short, an organization can make a rapid and highly informed decision whether or not to use OpenClinica without having to go through lengthy vendor-biased demonstrations and negotiations, and rely on a vendor in order to get their studies configured appropriately.

[BZ] How can technologies serve to clinical trial performance, to minimize costs and time to market, and to allow rapid decision making? Are innovative EDC technologies, like your platform, more performant and focused on this specific need, rather than ‘old-fashioned’ EDC Solutions?

[BB] Aside from features of the product and benefits of the open source model described above, Akaza Research’s business model for support is designed to maximize productivity of clinical trials. Our support is comprehensive and highly flexible, so customers are able to obtain support packages tailored to their needs. In addition, our customers find our support to be of extremely high quality-after all support is our primary source of revenue.

Most of our support isn’t priced “per study” so clients are able to amortize their investment over numerous studies and don’t have to go through a lengthy contracting process for each new clinical trial they want to use OpenClinica for. This can really help to minimize costs and accelerate the set-up time for new studies.

[BZ] What are the pro and cons of an open source technologies versus a classical technology in the SaaS model?

[BB] First, OpenClinica is available under both a SaaS model and local deployment. Open source has a number of benefits over “classical” proprietary EDC systems. Here are a few examples:

–  Reduce vendor lock-in. Numerous proprietary EDC companies have failed and gone out of business. Open source products exist and evolve independently of any particular vendor, so if one vendor ceases to exist, there are others readily available to take their place.

–  Improved security. Open source software is frequently more secure and bug free than proprietary software. The open source code is continuously (and often intensely) scrutinized by large community developers and security experts. As a result bugs and security issues are found and fixed usually before they become real problems.

–  Readily customizable. Open source systems can be readily customized and extended–you don’t need to rely on a vendor who may or may not make the software modifications you need. If the system doesn’t work the way to want it to, you can change it.

–  Enhanced validation. Validation can be much more thorough with open source software. Buying proprietary software is like buying a car with the  hood welded shut-you don’t know what’s really know going on behind the scenes. Open source provides the highest level of transparency making it possible to truly validate a system from end-to-end.