The Open Source Effect: Akaza Research Provides Insight into Rapid Growth of OpenClinica

OpenClinica has seen a surge in usage over the past year, according to recent survey conducted by Akaza Research.

“Our annual survey of the OpenClinica community showed strong expansion in all key measurements of system usage,” said Cal Collins, Chief Executive Officer at Akaza. “In the past year we have seen doubling in the number of OpenClinica users and subjects, and a nearly 10-fold increase in regulatory submissions.”

The company reports that a reported 168,989 subjects have been involved in OpenClinica-powered clinical trials, a 224 percent increase from the prior year. In tandem, the company identified a 246 percent increase in the number of OpenClinica software users. The figure measures users working at the sponsor or CRO level and does not include users at clinical trial sites.

“Since these figures are based on a voluntary survey of the OpenClinica community, they are likely underestimates,” said Collins. “While it can be difficult to precisely measure the usage of freely distributed open source software, they provide a clear indication of the growth in OpenClinica adoption around the world,” he added.

The Professional Open Source Model

OpenClinica stands in stark contrast against the landscape of other EDC products that are provided under a closed source license. Akaza Research’s “professional open source” business model makes OpenClinica available in two editions. The OpenClinica Community Edition is freely available to use and modify, and may be downloaded form www.openclinica.org. The OpenClinica Enterprise Edition is a certified build of the open source technology commercially supported by Akaza Research. In many respects, the company’s business model is similar to that of RedHat (Linux), MySQL (database software), and other open source companies.

The OpenClinica rapidly growing open source community currently comprises over 10,500 users and developers, many of whom help review and adapt the open source software. Roughly 33 percent of OpenClinica users are located in North America, 30 percent in Europe, 14 percent in Asia, 9 percent in Africa, 7 percent in South America, and 7 percent in Australia. OpenClinica community members drive much of the product’s evolution, and in recent years have helped to usher the technology into a wide variety of clinical trial settings.

Worldwide Acceptance in Regulated Trials

The composition of the OpenClinica community is changing over time, with an increasing number of OpenClinica users representing commercial clinical trials. Currently, 55 percent of the OpenClinica community members identifies themselves as working in industry, with the remainder in academic or government settings.

According to Collins, “the robust overall growth is highlighted by an increasing proportion of OpenClinica users representing pharmaceutical, biotech, device, and other companies. We saw a 975 percent increase in OpenClinica-powered trials used in regulatory submissions in the past year, and in the next 12 months OpenClinica adopters expect to increase this number by another 200 percent. This is consistent with our OpenClinica Enterprise Edition customer growth, where a majority of new customers are from industry.”

For more information about OpenClinica see the OpenClinica website.

OpenClinica 3.0 Features Preview: Part III

Welcome to the 3rd and final installment of the OpenClinica 3.0 features preview!  This post covers the new Web Services interface that is part of 3.0 and the job scheduler that can be used to automate Data Import and Data Export jobs.

OpenClinica 3.0 allows for programmatic interaction with external applications to reduce manual data entry and facilitate real-time data interchange with other systems.  The OpenClinica web services interface uses a SOAP-based API to allow the registering of a subject and scheduling of an event for a study subject.

OpenClinica provides a WSDL (Web Service Definition Language) that defines a structured format which allows OpenClinica to accept “messages” from an external system. For example, an EHR system could register subjects for a study in OpenClinica without direct human intervention. At the same time, the EHR could also be programmatically scheduling study events for these subjects. More information about the OpenClinica API can be found on the OpenClinica developer wiki.

An early reference implementation conducted by clinical lab Geneuity used the API to create a web service which inserts data programmatically into OpenClinica CRFs directly from laboratory devices. See the post by Geneuity’s Colton Smith below.

Another major productivity tool in 3.0 is the introduction of a Job Scheduler for automating bulk data import and export.  With this feature users can define a job that will generate an export at a specified time interval.  The Jobs Scheduler can also be configured to regularly scan a specific location for CDISC ODM files and run data imports when a new file is available. This feature can be particularly helpful in automating routing functions, such as the incorporation of lab data into OpenClinica from an external system.  The lab data does need to be in a valid CDISC ODM format (this can be accomplished via another great open source tool called Mirth), but it does save a person from entering data in two applications separately.

At time of this post, OpenClinica 3.0 is currently released as a beta3, but the production ready application is soon to follow. The application is passing through the highly rigorous strictures of our quality system (think Navy Seals training for software) and the output will be fully validated and ready of use in roughly a month. Needless to say, I, and everyone else here at Akaza is very excited to be so close to releasing 3.0. It is already quite clear that this release will have a momentous, positive impact on the community.

Selling open source without mentioning open source

I am a regular reader of  “The Open Road” blog by Matt Assay on news.com. In one of his latest posts, “Getting open-source criticism wrong”, he does a great job of making the case that commercial open source software is about ease of adoption, flexibility, and choice.

It struck a chord because my sales team and I spend a great amount of time and effort explaining to prospective customers that we offer the same level of quality, stability, performance, service, and support as a proprietary vendor. In many cases we must meet a higher threshold than those vendors, because we do not have the lock-in of a commercial software license to compel customers to come back to us for repeat business. Our track record of successful long-term customer relationship is evidence we meet this threshold.

In certain sales situations, for the sake of simplicity and clarity, we have to focus only on these apples-to-apples characteristics, and do not have the opportunity to educate on the economic and technical advantages of OSS as much as we would like. It’s great to know that our open source clinical data management software technology and service offerings can stand successfully on these merits. However, as many readers of this blog already know, open source offers an additional set of critical benefits: “the ability to adopt software rapidly and at low cost, the flexibility to develop and extend their systems as they choose, and the ability to reduce risk by obtaining paid commercial-grade [or better] support”. As more decision makers are coming to understand, it is following this path, rather than the adoption of pricey, monolithic proprietary software, that leads to better outcomes and greater ROI.