HTML Tips to Enhance Your eCRF

In some cases, the display of your OpenClinica eCRF may not be exactly what you had in mind. You may want to highlight key words or phrases, create a bullet point list, or insert a URL or image. Using HTML tags, you can make some simple manipulations to change the look and feel of your case report forms and make them more inviting for data entry.

Using HTML tags to enhance your eCRF

The HTML tags described in this document can be used in the following columns in the CRF Excel template:

  • Items Tab: LEFT_ITEM_TEXT
  • Items Tab: RIGHT_ITEM_TEXT
  • Items Tab: HEADER
  • Items Tab: SUBHEADER
  • Sections Tab: INSTRUCTIONS

What are HTML tags?

HTML, or Hyper Text Markup Language, is a markup language that is commonly used for web page development. HTML is written using “tags” that surround text or elements. These tags typically come in pairs, with a start tag and an end tag:

<start tag>Text to format</end tag>

To insert an HTML tag, simply surround the text you want to format with the desired tag. Below are the HTML tags that work in OpenClinica:

Table

You can download this HTML Tags Knowledge Article to help you to get started.

Inserting URLs and Images

HTML also allows you to insert a URL or Image into your CRF, which may be used to provide users with additional information or references.

Insert a URL

A URL may be inserted into a CRF in order to provide a link to further instructions or protocol information. To insert a URL into your CRF, use the following format:

Inserting images - using HTML tags to optimize your eCRF

Simply replace the areas highlighted in yellow with (a) your URL (inside the quotation marks) and (b) the hyperlinked text that you want to display to the user.

The following example will prompt the user to “Click Here!” and will open the OpenClinica website in a new browser tab:

<a href=”https://www.openclinica.com” target=”_blank”>Click Here!</a>

Inserting an image - using HTML tags to optimize your eCRF

Insert an Image

Similarly, HTML can be used to insert an image into your CRF. You might consider using an image to display a pain scale (or other reference image), or even to display your company’s logo.

Inserting an image - using HTML tags in OpenClinica

To insert an image into your CRF, use the following format:

<img src=”images/ImageName”>

Again, simply replace the highlighted text with your image name. You can use PNG, JPG, or GIF image extensions. You can control the height and width of the image using the following format:

<img src=”images/ImageName” width=“n” height=“n”>

The highlighted n corresponds to the desired width and height of the image in pixels.

The following example will insert an image (image1.png) with a width of 300 and a height of 150:

<img src=”images/image1.png” width=”300″ height=”150″>

You can download this Images & URLs Example CRF to help you practice.

The examples included in the above CRF Excel template will insert an image that already exists in the images directory of your OpenClinica application. To insert a custom image, community users will need to place the image in the following directory of the OpenClinica application:

tomcatwebappsOpenClinicaimages

OpenClinica Enterprise customers can request an image be placed on the application server by reaching out to the OpenClinica Enterprise Support team via the Issue Tracker.

Have you used HTML in your CRFs? Let us know if you have any other suggestions or tips!


IMPORTANT NOTES:

 The RESPONSE_OPTIONS_TEXT field is not included in the list above, as HTML tags are currently not supported for response options.

 The QUESTION_NUMBER field will display the text properly, but has been known to cause issues when extracting data. Therefore, HTML should not be used in this column.

OpenClinica 3.1 is Finally Here!

After nearly 20 months, OpenClinica 3.1 is finally ready to meet the world as a production ready application.  You may download OpenClinica 3.1 here.  It has been a long and arduous road, but the final incarnation of 3.1 is the most significant leap forward for the OpenClinica clinical trials software.

OpenClinica 3.1 further accelerates clinical productivity and enhances the clinical trial experience in a number of notable ways:

  • Improved data entry save time and increased performance for accessing large amounts of data.  The architecture around the data entry process in OpenClinica was re-factored to allow more concurrent users accessing the system while conducting more intensive simultaneous processes.  With this re-factoring, page turn times have seen a 10x (and sometimes better) speed improvement.  At the same time, large extracts which had to be broken into smaller subsets in the past can now be executed in a single batch.
  • Skip logic to ensure data entry users only see CRF fields and sections relevant to entering their data.  When a user accesses an eCRF to enter data for a patient or subject, they will only see the fields pertinent to be collected at that time.  Logic can be built in to the eCRF to show or hide additional fields based on the values provided in previous questions.
  • Streamlined discrepancy and query management infrastructure that allows issues around questionable data to be resolved more quickly.  A new interface for creating and responding to discrepancies, as well as new filters for query aging, to support faster resolution of data issues.  The number of clicks for filtering/sorting discrepancy notes, viewing the data responsible for the discrepancy note, and returned back to your filtered set of reports has been cut in half.
  • GUI-based creation, testing, and management of complex cross field/cross form multivariate edit checks.  A simple drag and drop interface has been implemented to facilitate the faster creation of complex edit checks.  This new interface interacts with authorized OpenClinica instances to speed up the study design process for OpenClinica Enterprise edition clients.
  • Plug-in architecture for exporting data collected in OpenClinica which supports the transformation of data into any output format.
  • OpenClinica Data Mart to easily report clinical trial results collected through OpenClinica.

These last two items have been covered extensively in previous blog posts.  Please see Plug-in Architecture for OpenClinica Data Extracts and Video Demo of New OpenClinica Data Mart.

We will be hosting an OpenClinica Community Virtual Forum shortly to demonstrate some of these new capabilities.  Also, keep this blog on your RSS feed or bookmarked in your browser, as future posts will dive into more details of the new features and functionality in OpenClinica 3.1.

– Paul Galvin

OpenClinica CRF Library

UPDATE (03-May-2010): The CRF Library is now live at library.openclinica.org.

Our vision at Akaza Research is to accelerate clinical research through open technology infrastructure. We do this through an open source software license, supporting a participatory community, and adhering to published open standards.

We are nearing another milestone that will further this vision. The OpenClinica CRF Library, currently in the final stages of development, will allow users to find, share, and re-use case report forms (CRFs) for OpenClinica. By utilizing the OpenClinica CRF Library, users will be able to:

  • Enable faster study startup by accessing a well organized, searchable database of OpenClinica CRF templates
  • Promote data standardization within their organization through re-use of CRFs that adhere to open industry standards
  • Derive customized versions from standardized CRF templates simply by editing the OpenClinica CRF Templates
  • Minimize time and cost spent on study training, testing, and validation by accessing value-added resources and documentation (including implementation guides, CRF Completion Guidelines, and test scripts) associated with the CRF templates in the library.

The library will be searchable by keyword and browsable by CRF type. Most CRFs are derived from authoritative, public standards sources such as the CDISC Clinical Data Acquisition Standards Harmonization (CDASH) initiative and the National Cancer Institute’s Cancer Data Standards Repository (caDSR).

In keeping with our vision, the CRF Library is the product of a participatory community and is based on open source software. Last April, we assembled a volunteer Steering Committee to guide development of the library. Committee members Liz Watts of Starfire Research, Lori Brix of Silent Partners, Derek Wimmer of Wimmer Clinical, and Elisa Priest of Baylor Research Institute have worked scrupulously to identify content, develop supporting materials for the CRFs, and implement workflows that will ensure quality resources. Their substantial knowledge of the CDASH standard and data management expertise has been invaluable. The broader community has also had a hand in building out this resource, through the user mailing list and at meetings of the OpenClinica Community Virtual Forum.

Content & Quality

One of the first questions the Steering Committee asked was, ‘How do we manage quality of content and metadata?’ There are many community-driven, peer-review, and commercial validation models that could work, from a loose ‘wikipedia’-style structure to more rigid frameworks for curation and standardization. We needed to adopt the right mix for our content and our community. The Committee emphasized the need for a high-quality ‘core’ set of CRFs that have broad applicability across studies, align to leading standards, and are accompanied by detailed resources which aid in implementation. At the same time, a larger, more diverse repository of CRF content would make the library useful to many in the OpenClinica community.

The result of this has been to create two broad classes of CRFs in the library, Curated CRFs and and Non-Curated CRFs.

Curated CRFs have gone through a rigorous peer review, testing, and annotation process. They include enhanced metadata, detailed specifications, validation test scripts, enhanced edit checks, and reference documentation such as an Implementation Guide and CRF Completion Guidelines. The initial collection of Curated CRFs in the library will be aligned with the CDASH Domains. The intent is to make it as easy as possible to implement these CRFs into a study, in ‘as-is’ or customized form, with confidence in the quality and accuracy of the CRF.

Non-Curated CRFs will be contributed by members of the community who wish to share their CRFs with others, or will be derived from existing non-proprietary electronic sources such as the National Cancer Institute’s Cancer Data Standards Repository (caDSR). These CRFs undergo less formal review and testing and have fewer supporting materials, instead will rely more heavily on community feedback and annotations.

Because of the significant investment made in annotation, review, and testing, full access to Curated CRFs and all the associated metadata, documentation, and associated resources will be available only to OpenClinica Enterprise Edition Subscribers. Non-Curated CRFs, and limited versions of Curated CRFs without detailed metadata or documentation will be freely available to all members of the OpenClinica community.

Contribution

Based on past discussions on the OpenClinica mailing lists and the Community Virtual Forum, we see substantial interest among community members in contributing and sharing CRFs. This is a very exciting prospect, and we will need community members to contribute enough quality CRF content to make the approach viable. Many community members have expressed interest in sharing their CRFs for others’ benefit, but also identified it as a way to get feedback and improve the forms for their own purposes. To provide a foundation for such contributions, the CRF Library will adhere to the following principles:

1) Contributors will be appropriately attributed and recognized for their contributions. Creative Commons (http://creativecommons.org/) provides widely used guidelines and license agreements to enable this type of sharing. CRFs in the library or derived therefrom will be made available under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License. Contributors must represent that they (or their organization) have the legal right to contribute a CRF, and are not infringing on someone else’s copyright. When featuring the most popular or most highly rated CRFs, the CRF Library will highlight the identity of the contributor (at least by screen name).

2) Members of the community will be empowered to build on and improve others’ contributions for the benefit of all. All community-contributed CRFs will also be freely available to community members, and we will put into place popularity, versioning, and annotation features to allow users of a CRF to provide feedback and/or modifications to the original author.

Next Steps

As I mentioned at the start of the post, we are approaching roll-out of the CRF Library within initial CDASH-based content, and starting acceptance of community contributions. The roll-out will be aligned with the OpenClinica Global Conference (March 22nd in Bethesda, MD USA) and the CRF Library will be a featured topic at the event. It’s been a long time in development and we are excited to be nearing this milestone!