Introducing OpenClinica Participate

In clinical research, we all work towards better evidence-based, patient-centered health interventions. We all understand the importance of evidence. But how about patient-centered? We hear this phrase perhaps too often nowadays, but it’s more than just a buzzword. A patient-centered approach directs research toward questions that are important to patients so they can make more informed healthcare decisions. It measures the outcomes that are noticeable and important to patients, and produces results that help them weigh the value of healthcare.

At OpenClinica, we think increasing the patient-centeredness of research is vital. Industry, NIH, FDA, and the general public seem to agree, and furthermore share our view that technology can increase patient engagement. This can happen by designing highly accessible, mobile technology to:

  • Improve patient participation, motivation, and adherence
  • Increase ability to meet recruitment goals, budget, and completion timelines
  • Enable new designs that better target populations and/or more closely align with real-world use

HTCPhoneI’d like to introduce our upcoming product, OpenClinica Participate, a tool tightly integrated with OpenClinica for engaging patients and collecting data directly from study participants.

If you took our recent survey, you got a glimpse of what your forms for patient-reported outcomes could look like in OpenClinica Participate. Driven by a powerful forms engine based on proven open-source technology, the participant forms are simple, dynamic, mobile-focused, and platform-independent.

But it’s about a lot more than mobile-friendly forms. Patient expectations are rising while trial participation is shrinking. Clinical trials need to engage ‘Subjects’ as ‘Participants’ — by recruiting and retaining through real-time engagement and meeting the ‘anytime, anywhere’ expectations of a mobile, smartphone enabled world. It starts with an intuitive, action-oriented dashboard. Participants are greeted with a simple interface that motivates and focuses them on what they need to do today. The layout is responsive and knows whether you are using your phone, a tablet, or a traditional browser. Communication with the participant can occur through multiple channels — via the dashboard, through SMS, or via email, with options to help you make sure the right balance is struck between security and accessibility.

Participate_OCUILast, and perhaps most important, Participate is tightly integrated with the OpenClinica EDC platform. The Participate solution allows you to design your study and forms using the OpenClinica study build tools you already know, while seamlessly capturing all your clinical and participant-reported outcomes in a single database. You can build skip patterns, repeats, and other logic into your participant forms just as you do with traditional OpenClinica CRFs, using the same rules engine. You can use scheduling rules to identify the next time participant feedback is required. As data is submitted by study participants, their activities become part of the same audit trail that tracks what your clinical users do. The data they submit can immediately be reviewed and extracted along with CRF data from other sources.

Participate is extremely easy to adopt. As a modular add-on to your hosted OpenClinica Enterprise instance, it can be activated for any new study from within your study build screen. Forms are powered by the widely used open source enketo-express library and all editions of OpenClinica will support the widely-used OpenRosa API to let you run Enketo, ODK Collect, or any of a number of OpenRosa-compliant data capture clients. Participate utilizes a cloud-based Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) delivery model, so there is no costly and delay-inducing software deployment to worry about.

 

Visit the OpenClinica Participate Website

 

The Future of Open Source

It was a privilege for OpenClinica to help with the “Future of Open Source” survey recently completed by Michael Skok of North Bridge Ventures, Black Duck and Forrester. The survey polled users and other stakeholders across the entire spectrum of OSS.

Recently published results from the survey substantiate the idea that open source is ‘eating the software world’s lunch’ (to borrow a phrase from Michael). OSS powers innovation, increases security, and enables a virtuous cycle of proliferation and participation across major sectors of our economy. This is even true in healthcare and life sciences, and we are seeing these trends within OpenClinica community. People are adopting OpenClinica and other open source research technologies because of the quality, flexibility, and security they provide, not just to save a buck or two.

What I find particularly significant in the results is the increased recognition of quality as a key driver of adopting open source. 8 out of 10 survey respondents indicate quality as a factor for increased OSS adoption. This has vaulted from the #5 factor in the 2011 survey to #1. In research, quality and integrity of data are paramount. OpenClinica’s active (and vocal!) community’s constant scrutiny of the code, and continuous improvements demonstrate the power of the open source model in producing quality software. Furthermore, working in a regulated environment means you need to do more than just have quality technology. You also must provide documented evidence of its quality and know how to implement it reliably. The transparent development practices of open source are huge contributors to achieving the quality and reliability that clinical trials platforms require. Knowing that feature requests and bug reports are all publicly reported, tracked, and commentable means nothing can hide under the rug. A public source code respository provides a history of all changes to a piece of code. And of course, it greatly helps that many of the key tools and infrastructure that power open source projects are open source themselves.

That’s just one set of factors driving us to a more open, participatory future:

“As a result of all this, Open Source is enjoying a grassroots-led proliferation that starts with a growing number of new developers and extends through the vendors and enterprises to the applications and services, industries and verticals, reaching more people and things in our everyday lives than ever before… there are now over 1 million open source projects with over 100 billion lines of code and 10 million people contributing.”

One thing I predict we’ll see a lot more of in the next year, especially for OpenClinica and life sciences as a whole, is greater interaction between projects and communities. OSS reduces traditional barriers and lets more people ‘get their hands dirty’ with tools and technologies. As OSS tools, libraries, and apps proliferate, innovation will increasingly come from the mashups of these projects.

Follow the survey findings and updates @FutureofOSS and #FutureOSS